Ocean Beach is one of the most inexpensive places to visit in San Francisco! There's plenty of parking and most of what you can do is free! I was fortunate enough to have time to chase sunsets recently. Admittedly, the sunset took place behind some clouds but I'm familiar with the scene. It's been ages since I've hung out here and it was interesting to be surrounded by several cars from Sacramento. Must've been the long weekend! It was a windy day so actually getting out of the car was impossible. Well, unless you're ok collecting sand in your hair (and ears and nose)!! Ha! Growing up, I was spoiled with Ocean Beach being so close. Many nights and mornings were spent here working on my list of lofty goals, being a rebel with a 40 oz and J (ok, much hasn't changed), jogging the trail, kissing the cool mist, bond fires during the summer... You won't find a ferris wheel, amusement park, or row of palm trees but nearby is the San Francisco Zoo (for all you animals!!) and a lot of restaurants. Bring a jacket!
Close to this island is a little island that provides excellent snorkeling opportunities. You may even spot a few reef sharks. Bathtub-warm water and fine sand beaches kept me here for over three weeks. It will do the same for you. Visit between November and March for the best weather and the fewest people. May through October sees a harsh monsoon season that shuts the island down. The best way to get there is by boat from Pak Bara.
One of the earliest residents of Ocean Beach was D. C. Collier, who bought oceanfront property there in 1887 when he was just 16. He later became one of the "fathers" of Ocean Beach, laying out streets, promoting sales, and building the Point Loma Railroad in 1909 to connect Ocean Beach with the rest of San Diego. By 1910 there were 100 houses in Ocean Beach, compared to just 18 two years earlier. According to historian Ruth Held, Collier's rail line "made OB possible."[7] He also built Ocean Beach Elementary School (a two-room school) and donated park land to the city. Most of that land became Cleator Community Park (a ballfield), Correia Middle School (originally named Collier Junior High School), a YMCA and a church; a small remnant at Greene and Soto streets is still called Collier Park.[7]

1938: First front-mounted swimmer's breathing tube patent filed. In December 1938, French spearfisherman Maxime Forjot and his business partner Albert Méjean file a patent application in France for a breathing tube worn on the front of the head over a single-lens diving mask enclosing the eyes and the nose and it is granted French patent 847848 on 10 July 1939.[29][30][31][32] In July 1939, Popular Science magazine publishes an article containing illustrations of a spearfisherman using a curved length of hosepipe as a front-mounted breathing tube and wearing a set of swimming goggles over his eyes and a pair of swimming fins on his feet.[33] In the first French monograph on spearfishing La Chasse aux Poissons (1940), medical researcher and amateur spearfisherman Dr Raymond Pulvénis illustrates his "Tuba", a breathing tube he designed to be worn on the front of the head over a single-lens diving mask enclosing the eyes and the nose. Francophone swimmers and divers have called their breathing tube "un tuba" ever since. In 1943, Raymond Pulvénis and his brother Roger obtain a Spanish patent for their improved breathing tube mouthpiece design.[34] In 1956, the UK diving equipment manufacturer E. T. Skinner (Typhoon) markets a "frontal" breathing tube with a bracket attachable to the screw at the top of an oval diving mask.[35] Although it falls out of favour with underwater swimmers eventually, the front-mounted snorkel becomes the breathing tube of choice in competitive swimming and finswimming (see Figure 4) because it contributes to the swimmer's hydrodynamic profile.
Ocean Beach City Beach is the main beach in the San Diego neighborhood of Ocean Beach. This is a wide sandy beach that has formed at the south side of the San Diego River mouth. Looking north you can see the neighborhood of Mission Beach on the other side of the rock jetties that protect the Mission Bay Entrance Channel. The southern view from City Beach is dominated by the Ocean Beach Pier which extends about a half-mile out into the Pacific Ocean. If you are visiting here for the first time you should walk out to the end of the pier to take in the view of the city. Below the pier and south of it you’ll find extensive tide pools that are exposed at low tide.
At first, visitor numbers remained behind original estimates. For a cost-effective operation, 1.25 million visitors per year are required. In 2005, the resort lost between 10 and 20 million euros. By October 2006 there were about 600,000 visitors. The initial lack of visitors has been attributed to various reasons, including the relatively remote location of Tropical Islands. In addition, in Berlin, South Brandenburg, the direct surrounding area of the resort, the disposable income is below the national average. The target demographic of the resort was extended to attract visitors from further away, including Poland.
Snorkelers normally wear the same kind of mask as those worn by scuba divers. By creating an airspace, the mask enables the snorkeler to see clearly underwater. All scuba diving masks consist of the lenses also known as a faceplate, a soft rubber skirt, which encloses the nose and seals against the face, and a head strap to hold it in place. There are different styles and shapes. These range from oval shaped models to lower internal volume masks and may be made from different materials; common choices are silicone and rubber. A snorkeler who remains at the surface can use swimmer's goggles which do not enclose the nose.

The Cook Islands is a 15-island archipelago nation in the South Pacific, halfway between New Zealand and Hawaii, southwest of Tahiti. The islands are scattered across 2.2 million square kilometers of the ocean and 240 square kilometers of land. The Islands’ ancient volcanic peaks, covered with dense vegetation, slope to brilliant white sands and quaint palm-fringed blue lagoons.
Go ahead and suit yourself up for the summer of a lifetime. At Hollister, we’ve got all the hottest swimwear looks for summer. Seriously, from bikinis to monokinis, we have a swimsuit for every girl. From strappy off-the-shoulder swim tops to lace trim triangle tops, you’re hardest decision will be which suit to pick. So, go ahead, and snag a couple of pairs. That way you can mix and match depending on where ever the day or night takes you. Whether it’s a day spent splashing in the waves or a late night beach bonfire, you’ll be ready.
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