Imagine yourself happily snorkeling around, admiring the beauty of the underwater world. Then all of a sudden, from the corner of your eye, you see someone flapping around half swimming, half drowning, scaring away half of the fish away from the sea. Yup, we’ve all been there at one point or another. If you’re new to it, don’t fret. Here’s a beginner’s guide to snorkeling to make sure that you don’t look like THAT person.
The Park and Cliff House Railroad ran west along California Street and then along the coast to turn south on 48th Avenue. This 36-inch (91 cm) narrow-gauge railway began service in 1887 with six 2-4-2T Baldwins (C/N 8955, 8961, 8973, 8974, 9065 & 9073). The company was reorganized as the Ferries and Cliff House Railroad with two more 2-4-2T Baldwins (C/N 9756 & 9763) built in 1889. These locomotives were widely distributed during the first decade of the 20th century. One went to the Diamond and Caldor Railway, one to the Oahu Railway and Land Company, one to the San Jose and Santa Clara Electric Company, one to the Glynn and Peterson Lumber Company, and two to the Red River Lumber Company in Westwood, California.[8]
A snorkel can be useful when scuba diving as it is a safe way of swimming face down at the surface for extended periods to conserve the bottled air supply, or in an emergency situation when there is a problem with either air supply or regulator.[63] Many dives do not require the use of a snorkel at all, and some scuba divers do not consider a snorkel a necessary or even useful piece of equipment, but the usefulness of a snorkel depends on the dive plan and the dive site. If there is no requirement to swim face down and see what is happening underwater, then a snorkel is not useful. If it is necessary to swim over heavy seaweed which can entangle the pillar valve and regulator if the diver swims face upward to get to and from the dive site, then a snorkel is useful to save breathing gas.
This enchanting little village perched on the eastern half of Busuanga Island is without a doubt one of the most stunning tropical places I’ve had the pleasure of visiting. Eight years ago the entire island was without roads, phone lines or even a water system, but word has begun to spread and its recent growth has me worried that a steep spike in tourism is looming just around the corner — just look at what happened to its neighboring island, Boracay, over the past 10 years. If you visit Coron Island today, you’ll have the option to hop around 3,000 little islands, scuba dive in a plethora of clear water locations including Kayangan Lake, climb up mountains with breathtaking views, swim in natural hot springs and eat like a local without a Starbucks in sight.
What was once a French colonial resort town in southern Cambodia is now a quiet coastal getaway surrounded by tropical islands. Known for its seafood market, where the fish practically jump from the water to your plate, it’s easy to see why Kep won’t be kept a secret for long. For the time being, you’ll find very few tourists among the locals sampling fresh crab, lobster, shrimp (and pretty much anything that swims) at its popular seafood market — you can go there around sunset and have yourself a five-star meal for less than a few dollars. Travelers visit Kep for its laid-back atmosphere rather than an extensive list of activities. In the past, Kep was primarily limited to expats living in Phnom Penh looking for a quiet weekend getaway, but with a variety of nearby tropical islands like Koh Tonsay — better known as Rabbit Island — it’s no wonder Kep is becoming more difficult for visitors to stay away from.
Snorkeling doesn’t require any training. If you are able to swim you’ll be able to enjoy the activity by simply slipping on your snorkeling gear and entering the water. Someone who has never snorkeled before can be a pro within minutes. More advanced swimmers can dive down a little ways while snorkeling, but they can stay underwater only as long as they can hold their breath.
Snorkeling is simply swimming along the surface of the water and looking down at the oceanic activity below you. No special skills or training is required, and the equipment needed to do it is minimal. Scuba, or SCUBA, is an acronym for Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus, which is the pressurized air tank you need to wear as you dive well below the surface. It’s what allows you to be fully immersed (both literally and figuratively) in the ocean life around you. It’s a more extreme experience, and as such, more training and equipment are necessary.
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