It is a single location dive.  A dive the late afternoon during the light and then we come up as planned just before the sunset.  We watch the sunset, a Keys favorite, and then prepare for the second dive.  Once dark, we dive the second dive to witness an amazing transformation of the reef.  New species coming out of the coral, new activity all around, and even surface bioluminescence that you will be delighted to see.  It’s a new world down there and you will be one of the few lucky ones to see it all happen in front of you.
I unzipped my tent, which looked like the ones I’d seen a few weeks before when watching Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened. Inside, the otherwise unremarkable heat became overwhelming. T.I. had largely emptied, but because the dome functions like a gigantic echo chamber it felt like I was camping inside a soccer stadium with a game going. Condensation pitter-pattered down on one corner of my tent from hundreds of feet above. Before I finally passed out, I heard the anguished cry of a single flamingo.
One of the earliest residents of Ocean Beach was D. C. Collier, who bought oceanfront property there in 1887 when he was just 16. He later became one of the "fathers" of Ocean Beach, laying out streets, promoting sales, and building the Point Loma Railroad in 1909 to connect Ocean Beach with the rest of San Diego. By 1910 there were 100 houses in Ocean Beach, compared to just 18 two years earlier. According to historian Ruth Held, Collier's rail line "made OB possible."[7] He also built Ocean Beach Elementary School (a two-room school) and donated park land to the city. Most of that land became Cleator Community Park (a ballfield), Correia Middle School (originally named Collier Junior High School), a YMCA and a church; a small remnant at Greene and Soto streets is still called Collier Park.[7]
I awoke at six when the babies in nearby tents did, and then again, at seven, when the heat became too much to bear. Exhausted and frazzled, I walked to breakfast. At the next table, a trio of kids excitedly debated where to start their day. It was nice to see how happy T.I. made them. But for me, sitting in the “open air” plaza beneath a completely sealed dome felt like waiting out a significant delay at the airport. Polishing off some bacon, I realized I actually wasn’t beholden to air traffic controllers or freak storms. I could spend the twenty-four hours I’d planned to, but I could also leave. With a spring in my step, I took the long way back to my tent, pausing for one last look at the sea. I felt happier than I had the entire stay. I could have gotten one of the most coveted beach chairs under a palm tree in the sand. Instead, I settled the bill I’d racked up on my faceless money watch and breezed through the turnstile.
Have you been dreaming of warm summer days lying under palm trees at the beach or floating in the ocean on your surfboard? We have, and to prepare ourselves for the long awaited arrival of our favorite summer season we’ve been working hard on the designs for this season’s bikinis for women. At ROXY, we’re experts when it comes to surf lifestyle and beachwear, and our bikinis provide the best possible designs for you to slip into this summer. Bikinis are a staple of any surfer girl or beach bum’s wardrobe, and we want to make sure you’re dressed in the best when it comes to your day of fun in the sun.
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