A bikini is typically a women's two-piece swimsuit featuring two triangles of fabric on top, similar to a bra and covering the woman's breasts, and two triangles of fabric on the bottom, the front covering the pelvis but exposing the navel, and the back covering the buttocks.[1][2] The size of the top and bottom can vary from full coverage of the breasts, pelvis, and buttocks, to very skimpy designs like a thong or G-string that cover only the areolae and mons pubis, but expose the buttocks.
In case of returns, simply affix the peel away return label to your package and return it to us using the carrier of your choice. Be sure to send it Shipping and Handling prepaid; no CODs allowed. By using this label you authorize our customs broker to act as your agent with the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (“CCRA”) to clear merchandise and process all duty and tax refunds.
How committed are you to summer's crochet trend? Mildly, like only-buy-one-top-and-wear-it-on-a-summer-Friday committed, or full-blown, let's-make-everything-crochet committed? It seems like fashion brands are betting on the latter, as crochet bikinis and one-pieces once again rank highly among swimwear offerings this season. And you can choose your own adventure—or, rather, take on the trend: Go subtle with a crochet trim lining a triangle-top bikini, or embrace the texture with a fully crocheted one-piece. Just don't be surprised when you lock eyes with another crochet-loving beach-goer over the next few months.
By making an analogy with words like bilingual and bilateral containing the Latin prefix "bi-" (meaning "two" in Latin), the word bikini was first back-derived as consisting of two parts, [bi + kini] by Rudi Gernreich, who introduced the monokini in 1964.[18][19] Later swimsuit designs like the tankini and trikini further cemented this derivation.[20] Over time the "–kini family" (as dubbed by author William Safire[21]), including the "–ini sisters" (as dubbed by designer Anne Cole[22]), expanded into a variety of swimwear including the monokini (also known as a numokini or unikini), seekini, tankini, camikini, hikini (also hipkini), minikini, face-kini, burkini, and microkini.[23] The Language Report, compiled by lexicographer Susie Dent and published by the Oxford University Press (OUP) in 2003, considers lexicographic inventions like bandeaukini and camkini, two variants of the tankini, important to observe.[24] Although "bikini" was originally a registered trademark of Réard, it has since become genericized.[25]

Complete your bikini set with a cute pair of swim bottoms to match. Make ‘em do a double take in our hipster bikini bottoms or cheeky bikini bottoms. Want a little extra coverage? Try our full coverage bikini bottoms or our high rise bikini bottoms. If you’re really looking to change things up, strut your stuff in one of our retro-inspired, high cut bikini bottoms. At Pacsun, you’ll find the exact bikini bottom to match or mix it up with a different color or print—the choice is yours!

“[L]andscapes are cultures before they are nature—constructs of the imagination projected onto wood and water and rock,” Simon Schama wrote in 1995. In 2019, the quote appeared in the introduction to John Berger’s Landscapes, which I’d finally found time to read in a zero-gravity lounge chair overlooking the sea. But it wasn’t just any sea. The water was really water but not the salty kind, instead of a sandy bottom there was stainless steel flooring and, from the horizon, a gigantic canvas screen-printed with a photo of a blue sky rose up. Outside the dome, the sun had broken through clouds; inside, it filtered through a UV screen. I applied more sunscreen to my face. I considered taking a dip.
We provide a guide in the water to help our divers navigate the reef, to show off its highlights and to offer any in-water assistance that may be needed. There is no charge for this service. Many of our divers appreciate this, but it is not a requirement to follow the guide as long as you have a buddy diver.  Our guides take great pride in showing you something that you have never seen, especially the marine friends that they have made diving these beautiful reefs.
Diving while snorkeling requires that you learn to force your ears to “pop” to equalize pressure and swim below the surface more comfortable. You also need to practice expelling water from your snorkel by forcing a strong burst of air through the tube as you clear the water’s surface. Special “purge snorkels” are available on the market for those who want an extra line of protection against getting water in your mouth.

It’s easy for visitors to equate paradise with the thousand islands that make up the Maldives. Incredibly, each of the 90 resorts in the Maldives is situated on its own island. From the remarkable undersea restaurant of Conrad Maldives Rangali Island to the Four Seasons Maldives annual surfing championship on KudaHuraa, there is plenty to see and do.Visitors will find terrific diving and snorkeling around scads of coral house reefs inhabited with colorful marine life. Powdery white sand beaches and translucent turquoise waters beckon beachgoers.Honeymooners, eco-travelers, and those who can’t get enough of the earth’s natural beauty will find their Shangri-La here in the Indian Ocean.


1938: First front-mounted swimmer's breathing tube patent filed. In December 1938, French spearfisherman Maxime Forjot and his business partner Albert Méjean file a patent application in France for a breathing tube worn on the front of the head over a single-lens diving mask enclosing the eyes and the nose and it is granted French patent 847848 on 10 July 1939.[29][30][31][32] In July 1939, Popular Science magazine publishes an article containing illustrations of a spearfisherman using a curved length of hosepipe as a front-mounted breathing tube and wearing a set of swimming goggles over his eyes and a pair of swimming fins on his feet.[33] In the first French monograph on spearfishing La Chasse aux Poissons (1940), medical researcher and amateur spearfisherman Dr Raymond Pulvénis illustrates his "Tuba", a breathing tube he designed to be worn on the front of the head over a single-lens diving mask enclosing the eyes and the nose. Francophone swimmers and divers have called their breathing tube "un tuba" ever since. In 1943, Raymond Pulvénis and his brother Roger obtain a Spanish patent for their improved breathing tube mouthpiece design.[34] In 1956, the UK diving equipment manufacturer E. T. Skinner (Typhoon) markets a "frontal" breathing tube with a bracket attachable to the screw at the top of an oval diving mask.[35] Although it falls out of favour with underwater swimmers eventually, the front-mounted snorkel becomes the breathing tube of choice in competitive swimming and finswimming (see Figure 4) because it contributes to the swimmer's hydrodynamic profile.
Only go out if it is calm. This often means going in the mornings. Nothing will ruin your first time experience like going out into the ocean when there are waves. It makes entering, exiting and swimming in the water dangerous. It makes using your equipment more difficult. It greatly increases how much effort swimming requires. It may make you seasick. Waves almost always reduce underwater visibility, so you won't be able to see what you are there to see. So only get in the water if it is calm your first time (less than six inch waves).
When the (real) sun disappeared behind a cloud, I figured I should keep exploring. I considered a chicken Caesar salad at the nearby restaurant Palm Beach but decided to go a bit further afield. In the jungle, I found butterflies in mesh tents slurping from orange and pineapple slices and thatched huts with educational placards hiding electric equipment. Nature sounds piped through speakers, but the hundreds of varieties of tropical fauna weren’t plastic. I hope those aren’t real, I thought, wincing as I wound around the pathways to get a better look at a bunch of flamingos.
In May 1946, fashion designer Jacques Heim from Paris released a two-piece swimsuit design that he named the Atome.[3] Like swimsuits of the era, it covered the wearer's navel, and it failed to attract much attention. Clothing designer Louis Réard introduced his new, smaller design in July.[4] He named the swimsuit after the Bikini Atoll, where the first public test of a nuclear bomb had taken place only four days before. His skimpy design was risque, exposing the wearer's navel and much of her buttocks. No runway model would wear it, so he hired a nude dancer from the Casino de Paris to model it at a review of swimsuit fashions.[5]

Allow about 5-7 working (business) days for delivery. Orders must be picked up within 10 days of delivery to the access point. You will need to present government issued photo id, driver's license, passport, foreign national or military id as identification in order to pick up your package. If package is not picked up before the time expires, the order will automatically be sent to our warehouse to be processed as a return.
The Virgin Islands are divided into the U.S. Virgin Islands, which are comprised of St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas, and the British Virgin Islands, made up of Tortola, Virgin Gorda, Anegada, and Jost Van Dyke, along with numerous smaller islands and cays. All are part of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. On the U.S. side, St. Croix is the charming, historic, culturally diverse island, St. John is the favored eco-friendly destination, and St. Thomas is the chic and sophisticated island. On the British side, the islands are less developed, but more exclusive, catering to wealthy luxury travelers and sailing enthusiasts.

Boracayis an idyllic tropical island in the Western Visayas islands of the Philippines. Visitors will be mesmerized by White Beach with sand so soft it’s been compared to baby talc. The four-kilometer-long beach has been called the ‘finest beach in the world.’ Shoeless vacationers lounge on the beaches, get massages, and hang out at beach establishments. After sunset, the vibe turns lively where dancing and partying take center stage. On an island where the outdoors rules, visitors find opportunities to sail, kayak, trek, golf, dive, mountain bike, boat, windsurf, boardsail, and explore. Mambo Number 5 excursions include a little of everything.
Kids rode the waterslides in endless loops; couples walked around in matching robes or napped in sync. On the lazy river jet stream channel, I read the words “Memento Mori” tattooed in a scripty font between the shoulder blades of the man in front of me. I ate a frozen yogurt at Café Borneo while an employee wearing a harness walked by. He was pulling a hot air balloon filled with guests.

Culebra Island is beautiful. I just got back to Canada from Puerto Rico. I was there for a month. I loved Culebra so much I went back twice. On my second trip I spent two nights camping at Playa Flamenco. I paid $20 USD per night for a sweet little camping spot (section E). I saw turtles, amazing, colourful fish and met some wonderful people. The snorkelling was okay in terms of being able to see under water but the reefs are not healthy. There was plenty of coconut to pick to drink the water inside and eat the meat. I found passion fruit, mangoes (not ripe), almonds (not ripe) and another really weird looking fruit I don’t know the name of. While I didn’t enjoy the main island of Puerto Rico as much as I’d hoped, I would go back to Culebra if the opportunity ever arose. I made some friends (Perri and Hector–owners) at a little place in town called, “Aqui Me Quedo” who I will never forget their kindness and hospitality.
In the case of merchandise that Canadian customers return to Abercrombie & Fitch, Canadian customers agree that CCRA will send any refund of Customs Duties and Taxes that were paid on the returned merchandise to the Customs Broker, and that Canadian customers will obtain the refund directly from Abercrombie & Fitch. Canadian customers hereby authorize the Customs Broker to endorse any such refund checks issued by Revenue Canada in their name to Abercrombie & Fitch.
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