The reefs of Indonesia are everything any Blue Planet watcher might expect: nonstop riots of colorful coral obscured by curtains of fish. Top of the list for snorkelers would be Kungkungan Bay Resort, in the Lembeh Strait, just north of the island of Sulawesi. This hideaway resort is favored for a house reef accessible from shore, where water babies can spy scads of exotic life, from blue ribbon eels to cuttlefish. Plus, this resort practically invented the scuba phenomenon known as muck diving, aka checking out the wild, unusual critters that live amid the black sand muck. If you can get past the ugly factor of the bottom, as a snorkeler, you can also behold seahorses, leaf fish, pipefish, bobtail squid, flamboyant squid, blue-ringed octopi — the list goes on and on.

Snorkeling requires much less equipment; a mask that allows you to see the wonders of the underwater world, and a snorkeling breathing tube, typically 16 inches long, that allows you to submerge your face in the water while still being able to access the air above. Some snorkelers may want to use foot fins as well to move faster and with less effort on the surface.
The northern end of Ocean Beach was dominated in the early 20th century by the Wonderland Amusement Park, which opened on July 4, 1913 and was constructed on eight oceanfront acres at Voltaire and Abbott streets. It boasted a large roller coaster, dance pavilion, menagerie, roller skating rink, merry-go-round, children's playground, a petting zoo with a variety of animals including 500 monkeys, and 22,000 lights outlining the buildings. However, Wonderland went bankrupt in 1915 due to competition from the Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park and was sold at auction. It closed in 1916 after winter storms damaged the roller coaster.[8] The name "Wonderland" lives on in some Ocean Beach business names as well as the title of a documentary series on KPBS television hosted by Ocean Beach native Noah Tafolla.[9]
Photographs of Bernardini and articles about the event were widely carried by the press. The International Herald Tribune alone ran nine stories on the event.[63] French newspaper Le Figaro wrote, "People were craving the simple pleasures of the sea and the sun. For women, wearing a bikini signaled a kind of second liberation. There was really nothing sexual about this. It was instead a celebration of freedom and a return to the joys in life."[38]
In May 1946, fashion designer Jacques Heim from Paris released a two-piece swimsuit design that he named the Atome.[3] Like swimsuits of the era, it covered the wearer's navel, and it failed to attract much attention. Clothing designer Louis Réard introduced his new, smaller design in July.[4] He named the swimsuit after the Bikini Atoll, where the first public test of a nuclear bomb had taken place only four days before. His skimpy design was risque, exposing the wearer's navel and much of her buttocks. No runway model would wear it, so he hired a nude dancer from the Casino de Paris to model it at a review of swimsuit fashions.[5]

People head out to OB for the nice, wide, swath of sand. There's also the Ocean Beach pier—the longest pier on the West Coast—where you can try your hand at pier fishing. If you have a four-legged friend, go to Dog Beach, just north of the main beach, and unleash your pup to romp in the sand and surf. Or, stroll along Newport Avenue, the main drag in OB's business district, and take in the small-town feel.
Mannn this two piece was everything! As everyone else stated, it has no lining and that's NO issue until you get the water. This is perfect for beach or pool events where getting in the water isn't a big deal. It's still cotton so when the water hits the top, it gets heavy and stretches naturally making it hard to maintain. But again, It's really cute and it fit me really well. Very flattering too. Just have a back up top.
Snorkeling is simply swimming along the surface of the water and looking down at the oceanic activity below you. No special skills or training is required, and the equipment needed to do it is minimal. Scuba, or SCUBA, is an acronym for Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus, which is the pressurized air tank you need to wear as you dive well below the surface. It’s what allows you to be fully immersed (both literally and figuratively) in the ocean life around you. It’s a more extreme experience, and as such, more training and equipment are necessary.
Réard's company folded in 1988,[108] four years after his death.[109] By the end of the century, the bikini had become the most popular beachwear around the globe. According to French fashion historian Olivier Saillard, this was due to "the power of women, and not the power of fashion". As he explains, "The emancipation of swimwear has always been linked to the emancipation of women",[9] though one survey indicates 85% of all bikinis never touch the water.[110][unreliable source?] By 1988 the bikini made up nearly 20% of swimsuit sales, more than any other model in the US,[85] though one-piece suits made a comeback during the 1980s and early 1990s.[109]
In the heart of the South Pacific, Fiji, famous for its white sand beaches, crystal clear waters and unspoiled natural environment, is made up of more than 300 small islands. The perennial favorites are the Mamanuca and Yasawa island groups, just north of Fiji’s main island, Viti Levu. There you will find a kind of paradise you can’t find anywhere else. Snorkeling and diving, relaxing in the shade of a palm tree, and feeling the soft sea air drift by while sipping on a fruity umbrella drink — it’s heavenly.
But Indonesia has more than just Bali. The nearby Gili Islands are another incredible island getaway. Both destinations make for a more active tropical vacation and the weather remains pretty constant all year round (though April to October sees slightly drier weather). Both Bali and the Gili Islands are close enough that you should be able to visit them both on your trip to really get the most out of this idyllic corner of the world.

While some snorkeling spots can be tricky the guides have an exceptional knowledge of their surroundings, constantly making sure that you remain safe. Most importantly, most of the best snorkeling sites in the Galapagos are actually quite shallow, meaning you can swim and walk out from the beach and then simply swim and follow the coastline to the vivid reefs. Not only does the water depth make it safe for inexperienced snorkelers, it keeps you close to some of the most evocative marine life.
Colorful bikinis in yellow, khaki, neon, red, and rainbow shades look sexy on the beach in sweltering summers. You can choose different patterns for the tops such as bandeau, halter neck, high neck, strappy, etc. Rasta, color block, Jamaican and Brazilian designs look beautiful on you. You can take a pick from the cute patterns meant for the newborns and juniors too.
One of the most diverse islands in the South Pacific, Tanna’s main attraction is Mount Yasur – known as ‘the world’s most accessible active volcano’. Every afternoon, motorcades of 4X4 jeeps make the long and challenging journey across the island’s unsealed roads and ash covered plains to visit the mighty volcano. Making it to the volcano’s rim just in time for sunset, Yasur’s awe striking display of spewing lava and loud explosions fails to disappoint. Beyond the volcano, Tanna’s rainforests are home to ancient tribes that retain their traditional kustom way of life, and mysterious cargo cults still waiting for John Frum to return. Its volcanic reefs are perforated with natural blue holes, and its friendly teach you that you don’t need much in life to be happy!  

These statues, which average 13 feet in height and weigh about 14 tons, were created between the 10th and 16th century by the early inhabitants of the island. These monolithic stone heads are baffling to researchers who cannot figure out why the Rapa Nui people went through such enormous efforts to create them or how they carved them with primitive tools. Another lingering question is what happened to the Rapa Nui people? Rapa Nui’s early inhabitants came from other Polynesian island to this one to build a unique culture away from any influences. One theory is that they may have built these statues to honor their ancestors but had to leave once they had completely depleted the island resources. Once a thriving culture, Rapa Nui is today almost barren, with no trees and most of its soil being washed away in erosion. All that is left are these enormous monuments as a reminder of human achievement and resilience.
I would recommend living on the beach in Srithanu (that’s where I lived and I really liked it). You can stay inexpensively at Shangri-La at the south end of the beach or ask at the Monkey Bar beside there if Kai has any places available. He rents a number of nice houses overlooking the ocean outside of town. Both those places have really fast Internet which I’m sure you will need! All the best deals can be found by going there and asking around. The stuff online usually charges tourist prices.
Swim Slowly! Exhaustion is a common problem for first time snorkelers. Swimming takes a good bit of energy. The trick with snorkeling is to stay relaxed and calm. You can wipe yourself out quickly if you are not careful. Only swim at a speed that allows you to breathe slowly and easily through your snorkel. Your snorkel does limit your breath, so keep your activity level at a pace that does not demand heavy breathing. Your fins will make it much easier. Learn to just float without effort. Only swim rapidly if necessary for safety.
Or maybe you’re searching for the perfect one-piece? Hit the beach in style this summer with a super cute cut-out or strappy low-back one-piece. We absolutely love these looks paired with some comfy shorts for a stroll on the beach or a much-needed ice cream run. And you can always keep it breezy and throw on a beach cover-up and head for a seaside dinner. You really can’t go wrong. Summer has never looked so good on you.
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