Ocean Beach City Beach is the main beach in the San Diego neighborhood of Ocean Beach. This is a wide sandy beach that has formed at the south side of the San Diego River mouth. Looking north you can see the neighborhood of Mission Beach on the other side of the rock jetties that protect the Mission Bay Entrance Channel. The southern view from City Beach is dominated by the Ocean Beach Pier which extends about a half-mile out into the Pacific Ocean. If you are visiting here for the first time you should walk out to the end of the pier to take in the view of the city. Below the pier and south of it you’ll find extensive tide pools that are exposed at low tide.
1939: First side-mounted swimmers’ breathing tube patent filed. In December 1939, expatriate Russian spearfisherman Alexandre Kramarenko files a patent in France for a breathing tube worn at the side of the head with a ball valve at the top to exclude water and a flutter valve at the bottom. Kramarenko and his business partner Charles H. Wilen refile the invention in March 1940 in the USA, where their "underwater apparatus for swimmers" is granted US patent 2,317,236 on 20 April 1943;[36] after entering production in France, the device is called "Le Respirator".[37] The co-founder of Scubapro Dick Bonin is credited with the introduction of the flexible-hose snorkel in the mid-1950s and the exhaust valve to ease snorkel clearing in 1980.[38] In 1964, US Divers markets an L-shaped snorkel designed to outperform J-shaped models by increasing breathing ease, cutting water drag and eliminating the "water trap".[39] In the late 1960s, Dacor launches a "wraparound big-barrel" contoured snorkel, which closely follows the outline of the wearer's head and comes with a wider bore to improve airflow.[40] The findings of the 1977 report "Allergic reactions to mask skirts, regulator mouthpieces and snorkel mouthpieces"[41] encourage diving equipment manufacturers to fit snorkels with hypoallergenic gum rubber and medical-grade silicone mouthpieces (see Figure 5). In the world of underwater swimming and diving, the side-mounted snorkel has long become the norm, although new-generation full-face swim masks with integrated snorkels are beginning to grow in popularity for use in floating and swimming on the surface.
Kids rode the waterslides in endless loops; couples walked around in matching robes or napped in sync. On the lazy river jet stream channel, I read the words “Memento Mori” tattooed in a scripty font between the shoulder blades of the man in front of me. I ate a frozen yogurt at Café Borneo while an employee wearing a harness walked by. He was pulling a hot air balloon filled with guests.
The ocean’s most impressive creatures spend most of the time at depths, that are often only accessible to scuba divers. However, in the case of the Galapagos, there is iconic marine life that feasts on nutrient-rich reefs found all throughout the archipelago. Take for example, the Galapagos green turtles, which nest on the beaches and are a frequent sight at most snorkeling sites (December to March is a great time to see pregnant females very close to shore). Blacktip reef sharks also love the shallow coastal waters. While they might appear threatening at first, these small and sometimes inquisitive sharks are very safe to swim with and make for some beautiful moments in the water.
Northern California beaches. They tend to be cold and windy, and Ocean Beach is no exception. There are those glorious warm days that happen a few times per year in the Fall. If you choose this location for a photo shoot make sure that you wear layers at this location. And arm yourself with hair ties and clips, because it can get windy.  Take it from me, a family photographer (K. Sienk Photography)!
As we ventured further out, we saw a souvenir shop selling ice cream, candy, bottled water, and various articles of clothing or accessories with a San Diego logo. We found a small countertop display that had sunglasses for $9.99. It was perfect timing since it was almost 90 degrees out and the sun was out in full force. Next door to the shop is a restaurant called the Ocean Beach Pier Café which serves Mexican soft tacos, large breakfast plate offerings of three-egg omelets, tall pancake stacks with bacon and sausage links, humongous burgers, and seafood dishes such as fish and chips or clam chowder bread bowls. I saw a server bringing a monster plate of nachos to a single diner that was big enough to feed a group of four people.
“[L]andscapes are cultures before they are nature—constructs of the imagination projected onto wood and water and rock,” Simon Schama wrote in 1995. In 2019, the quote appeared in the introduction to John Berger’s Landscapes, which I’d finally found time to read in a zero-gravity lounge chair overlooking the sea. But it wasn’t just any sea. The water was really water but not the salty kind, instead of a sandy bottom there was stainless steel flooring and, from the horizon, a gigantic canvas screen-printed with a photo of a blue sky rose up. Outside the dome, the sun had broken through clouds; inside, it filtered through a UV screen. I applied more sunscreen to my face. I considered taking a dip.
In Hawaii, green sea turtles, known locally as honu, are revered, believed to be the embodiment of guardian spirits. They’re also thought to be good luck — funny because they’re found on every Kona beach. In the water, sightings of this reptile are super common in the town of Kailua-Kona at Kahaluu Beach Park, a tiny bay with minimal waves. Or try the site Two Step, a 30-minute drive south of town. Here, you’ll meet turtles, as well as schools of yellow tang, butterfly- and surgeonfish, plus seals and dolphins.
Made up of 115 islands spread through the Indian Ocean, the Seychelles is a dreamlike setting with stunning beaches. There are three main islands — Praslin, La Digue and Mahé — plus a plethora of smaller, outlying islands to visit and each has its own character, so you’ll surely want to visit each one on your quest for the perfect beach. The best part about the Seychelles is that it’s not overrun with tourists and maintains its local charm.
In most cases you need to have boots on the ground to find the really cheap long-term accommodations. Online locals usually jack up their prices to get the 1 to 2 weekers who will pay $1000s for a nice place. To get yourself started, you can find places as cheap as $29/night on AirBNB (try VRBO too) and you can negotiate those prices much lower if you’re staying long term and it’s outside the busy tourist season. I usually start with AirBNB and then ask around to find the cheaper places when I get to know some locals.
Spend a bit more and rent a dry snorkel, or at the least, a snorkel with a splash guard. One of the least pleasant experiences is having a flood of water come down your snorkel. A dry snorkel has a special valve on top that seals shut when your snorkel goes underwater (like with a wave, or when you tilt your head to the side). It will also have a special purge valve at the bottom of the snorkel so that it is easy to blow water out of the tube. For a first time snorkeler we find this piece of equipment essential (we use them ourselves). It is worth whatever additional rental costs. Learn more about different types of snorkels here.
To comply with the current European standard EN 1972 (2015), a snorkel for users with larger lung capacities should not exceed 38 centimeters in length and 230 cubic centimeters in internal volume, while the corresponding figures for users with smaller lung capacities are 35 cm and 150 cc respectively.[3] Current World Underwater Federation (CMAS) Surface Finswimming Rules (2017) require snorkels used in official competitions to have a total length between 43 and 48 cm and to have an inner diameter between 1.5 and 2.3 cm.[4] A longer tube would not allow breathing when snorkelling deeper, since it would place the lungs in deeper water where the surrounding water pressure is higher. The lungs would then be unable to inflate when the snorkeler inhales, because the muscles that expand the lungs are not strong enough to operate against the higher pressure.[5] The pressure difference across the tissues in the lungs, between the blood capillaries and air spaces would increase the risk of pulmonary edema.
It’s all about doubling your pleasure when you go to this private Brazilian spot, and no, we aren’t talking about a threesome post-Carnival. This private island is actually two islands connected by a bridge. Two houses, two decks, two times the fun. The property is on Ilha Grande, a 15-minute crossing by boat from Portogalo and two hours from Rio. The main house rocks four bedrooms, the smaller house two, and there are five canoes on site for all of your paddling needs.
In post-World War II Europe, Western Europeans enjoyed their first war-free summer in many years. French designers sought to deliver fashions that matched the liberated mood of the people.[47] Fabric was still in short supply,[49] and in an endeavor to resurrect swimwear sales, two French designers – Jacques Heim and Louis Réard  – almost simultaneously launched new two-piece swimsuit designs in 1946.[50][51] Heim launched a two-piece swimsuit design in Paris that he called the atome, after the smallest known particle of matter. He announced that it was the "world's smallest bathing suit."[52][47] Although briefer than the two-piece swimsuits of the 1930s, the bottom of Heim's new two-piece beach costume still covered the wearer's navel.[49][53][54][55]
Raquel Welch's fur bikini in One Million Years B.C. (1966) gave the world the most iconic bikini shot of all time and the poster image became an iconic moment in cinema history.[101] Her deer skin bikini in One Million Years B.C., advertised as "mankind's first bikini",[102] (1966) was later described as a "definitive look of the 1960s".[103] Her role wearing the leather bikini raised Welch to a fashion icon[9] and the photo of her in the bikini became a best-selling pinup poster.[103]
If you still need to relax, try a full body treatment at the Palazzo Versace Spa, Salus Per Aquum. You can also book a dual treatment at the couples suite, a great idea if you are on your honeymoon in Australia. Dual massage beds and soft candlelight create an intimate setting for you to enjoy your choice of body treatment in the company of your partner.
Culebra Island is beautiful. I just got back to Canada from Puerto Rico. I was there for a month. I loved Culebra so much I went back twice. On my second trip I spent two nights camping at Playa Flamenco. I paid $20 USD per night for a sweet little camping spot (section E). I saw turtles, amazing, colourful fish and met some wonderful people. The snorkelling was okay in terms of being able to see under water but the reefs are not healthy. There was plenty of coconut to pick to drink the water inside and eat the meat. I found passion fruit, mangoes (not ripe), almonds (not ripe) and another really weird looking fruit I don’t know the name of. While I didn’t enjoy the main island of Puerto Rico as much as I’d hoped, I would go back to Culebra if the opportunity ever arose. I made some friends (Perri and Hector–owners) at a little place in town called, “Aqui Me Quedo” who I will never forget their kindness and hospitality.

Thailand is a popular destination for honeymooners and couples who love beaches. Here you will find some of the world's best spas, delicious food and five star service. Naka has stunning private villas with unique modern architecture and calm tropical surroundings. AKARYN Samui is set on a sandy bay with luxury service that includes delivery of snacks, slices for the eyes, fresh towels and more.
Great blog, I travelled se Asia last year and found internet was fine but only really browsed a little. I want to return and work next yr. How do you feel the internet will perform for accessing CRM and work servers back in the UK and basically being connected full time to the cloud. do you think it will be too slow, or would it take up all of the speed from a co work space? I love the idea of koh phangan or Bali but thinking chiang Mai more realistic for internet reasons? Thanks mark
A third type of volcanic oceanic island is formed over volcanic hotspots. A hotspot is more or less stationary relative to the moving tectonic plate above it, so a chain of islands results as the plate drifts. Over long periods of time, this type of island is eventually "drowned" by isostatic adjustment and eroded, becoming a seamount. Plate movement across a hot-spot produces a line of islands oriented in the direction of the plate movement. An example is the Hawaiian Islands, from Hawaii to Kure, which continue beneath the sea surface in a more northerly direction as the Emperor Seamounts. Another chain with similar orientation is the Tuamotu Archipelago; its older, northerly trend is the Line Islands. The southernmost chain is the Austral Islands, with its northerly trending part the atolls in the nation of Tuvalu. Tristan da Cunha is an example of a hotspot volcano in the Atlantic Ocean. Another hotspot in the Atlantic is the island of Surtsey, which was formed in 1963.
Is it the best beach in the world? Well quite frankly, no, it isn't. Ocean Beach is nothing like what you'd find in Marin or on the Central Coast. It isn't the bluest or the clearest with the softest sand and the waves aren't as magical. Despite this, it still offers a wonderful escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. It's just a short trek over the Bay Bridge from the East Bay. In the summer, it makes for a wonderful way to cool off. Ocean Beach runs parallel to the great highway, and there's a nice walking trail located right beside it. The waves will sometimes leave an unusually foamy substance on the sand that I've only seen here at this beach. Although it gets crowded, I've never experienced it with an overload of people like you'd find at Baker Beach. The wind is blusterous and the waves are strong, but it still always feels so calming. If you're lucky enough to come here during a time when nobody else is around, take full advantage of it. There are a few benches located on the walking path where you can sit and have lunch. Some people like to make bonfires here when it's permitted. But no matter what, you should always bring a jacket and maybe even a blanket if you can because it gets super cold. I'm super grateful to have Ocean Beach so close by. It's a great local beach that will forever be hailed as a San Francisco favorite.
My first visit to this spectacular island was on a surprise birthday trip where I was literally blindfolded until the point when we boarded the ferry. After about an hour on the water, I was transferred to a tiny boat that would slowly drift us toward this tiny island — I had no idea where I was, only that I was somewhere off the coast of Sihanoukville, Cambodia, floating toward a slice of paradise. You’ll instantly fall in love with this remote island if you’re looking to unplug and get some much-needed peace and quiet. There are no roads, which means there are no big hotels and restaurants, and all you’ll find are private beachfront bungalows with little mom-and-pop restaurants. In fact, there are only a few places on the island that offer Wi-Fi at all and sometimes the signal is out completely. People come to this island to get away from it all, so it’s the perfect place for your next budget-friendly romantic getaway. You’ll find top-notch scuba diving, snorkeling, paddle boarding, fishing and the chance to swim at night with bioluminescent plankton, then wake up in the morning to white sandy beaches and dip your toes in the shimmering, unclouded water. What are you waiting for?
Surrounded by the second-largest coral reef in the world, it’s no surprise that this tropical destination is primarily visited by diving and snorkel enthusiasts. There aren’t many islands left in the Caribbean that you can visit without being shoulder-to-shoulder with tourists. Roatán has managed to hold onto its authentic charm while still being able to provide familiar western comforts. Cruise ships didn’t start coming here until 2005 and there aren’t a whole lot of flights to the area, which means the secret isn’t out quite yet, though this may change quickly as more people continue to flock to this 35-mile stretch of gorgeous Caribbean coastline. If you’ve never heard of Roatán, consider yourself lucky and put it on your list of tropical places to visit sooner than later.
9:00am, 12:30pm, 5:00pm low 3 hrs Beverages
I am going to teach English in South America beginning in Sept 2015 and was wondering what areas you would recommend. I am definitely looking for something tropical year-round, hopefully a smaller town off the beaten track (100,000 people or less), with plenty of hiking opportunities, beautiful sunny beaches, friendly locals, decent cost of living, good wi-fi, and yoga would be a HUGE plus. I am aiming to be fluent in Spanish by the time I arrive.
Beyond this, it is important to remember that the aquatic sights are pretty similar across all of the Galapagos snorkeling sites. Some of the snorkeling sites can be explored on land tours, while others can only be explored on half or full-day yacht tours. There isn’t a single itinerary that can include every single snorkeling site in the Galapagos– there are in fact many hundreds of options – nor is there a definitive list of the top ten snorkeling spots in the Galapagos. In a nutshell: there are nearly a hundred magnificent sites where you could snorkel!
Monokini 1964 A monokini (also called topless swimsuit, unikini or numokini) is a women's one-piece garment equivalent to the lower half of a bikini.[142] Originally a specific design conceived by Rudi Gernreich in 1964, the term is now used to describe any topless swimsuit,[143] particularly a bikini bottom worn without a top.[144] An extreme version of the monokini, the thong-style pubikini (which exposed the pubic region), was also designed by Rudi Gernreich in 1985.[145][146]

While the two-piece swimsuit as a design existed in classical antiquity,[8] the modern design first attracted public notice in Paris on July 5, 1946.[9] French automotive engineer Louis Réard introduced a design he named the "bikini", adopting the name from the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean,[10][11] which was the colonial name the Germans gave to the atoll, transliterated from the Marshallese name for the island, Pikinni.[12]

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