A snorkel is a device used for breathing air from above the surface when the wearer's head is face downwards in the water with the mouth and the nose submerged. It may be either separate or integrated into a swimming or diving mask. The integrated version is only suitable for surface snorkelling, while the separate device may also be used for underwater activities such as spearfishing, freediving, finswimming, underwater hockey, underwater rugby and for surface breathing with scuba equipment. A swimmer's snorkel is a tube bent into a shape often resembling the letter "L" or "J", fitted with a mouthpiece at the lower end and constructed of light metal, rubber or plastic. The snorkel may come with a rubber loop or a plastic clip enabling the snorkel to be attached to the outside of the head strap of the diving mask. Although the snorkel may also be secured by tucking the tube between the mask-strap and the head, this alternative strategy can lead to physical discomfort, mask leakage or even snorkel loss.[2]

In Europe, 17-year-old Brigitte Bardot wore scanty bikinis (by contemporary standards) in the French film Manina, la fille sans voiles ("Manina, the girl unveiled"). The promotion for the film, released in France in March 1953, drew more attention to Bardot's bikinis than to the film itself. By the time the film was released in the United States in 1958 it was re-titled Manina, the Girl in the Bikini. Bardot was also photographed wearing a bikini on the beach during the 1957 Cannes Film Festival. Working with her husband and agent Roger Vadim she garnered significant attention with photographs of her wearing a bikini on every beach in the south of France.[92]


Sister to neighboring Vieques, this tiny island 17 miles off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico is about as chill a place as you'll ever find. There are no big resorts, fancy restaurants, or pricey boutiques. What the place does have is empty beaches and fantastic snorkeling. The beaches of Carlos Rosario, Tamarindo Grande, Tamarindo, and Melones are all a part of the Luis Peña Channel Natural Reserve and a feeding ground for sea turtles and stingrays.
One feminist viewpoint sees the bikini uniform as objectification of women athletes.[178] US beach volleyball player Gabrielle Reece described the bikini bottoms as uncomfortable with constant "yanking and fiddling."[177][188] Many female beach volleyball players have suffered injuries by over-straining the abdominal muscles while many others have gone through augmentation mammoplasty to look appealing in their uniforms.[178] Australian competitor Nicole Sanderson said about match break entertainment that "it's kind of disrespectful to the female players. I'm sure the male spectators love it, but I find it a little bit offensive."[189]

Great blog, I travelled se Asia last year and found internet was fine but only really browsed a little. I want to return and work next yr. How do you feel the internet will perform for accessing CRM and work servers back in the UK and basically being connected full time to the cloud. do you think it will be too slow, or would it take up all of the speed from a co work space? I love the idea of koh phangan or Bali but thinking chiang Mai more realistic for internet reasons? Thanks mark

Tropical Islands was built by the Malaysian corporation Tanjong in the former airship hangar known as the Aerium. The hangar – the third largest free-standing hall in the world – was originally designed to protect large airships from the elements. It was purchased by Tanjong on 11 June 2003 for €17.5 million, of which €10 million was a subsidy from the federal state of Brandenburg. The building permit for constructing the theme park inside the hall was granted on 2 February 2004 and Tropical Islands officially opened on 19 December 2004.
Great blog, I travelled se Asia last year and found internet was fine but only really browsed a little. I want to return and work next yr. How do you feel the internet will perform for accessing CRM and work servers back in the UK and basically being connected full time to the cloud. do you think it will be too slow, or would it take up all of the speed from a co work space? I love the idea of koh phangan or Bali but thinking chiang Mai more realistic for internet reasons? Thanks mark

The northern end of Ocean Beach was dominated in the early 20th century by the Wonderland Amusement Park, which opened on July 4, 1913 and was constructed on eight oceanfront acres at Voltaire and Abbott streets. It boasted a large roller coaster, dance pavilion, menagerie, roller skating rink, merry-go-round, children's playground, a petting zoo with a variety of animals including 500 monkeys, and 22,000 lights outlining the buildings. However, Wonderland went bankrupt in 1915 due to competition from the Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park and was sold at auction. It closed in 1916 after winter storms damaged the roller coaster.[8] The name "Wonderland" lives on in some Ocean Beach business names as well as the title of a documentary series on KPBS television hosted by Ocean Beach native Noah Tafolla.[9]

Microkini 1995 A microkini, including subgenres like minikini, minimini and tear-drop, is an extremely meager bikini.[140] The designs for both women and men typically use only enough fabric to cover the genitals and, for women, the nipples. Any additional straps are merely to keep the garment attached to the wearer's body. Some variations of the microkini use adhesive or wire to hold the fabric in place over the genitals. Microkinis keep the wearer just within legal limits of decency and fill a niche between nudism and conservative swimwear.[141]
It always amazes me how so many people think travel and living abroad is expensive. That’s simply not true. If you stay long-term and rent a villa (or try housesitting) you can live for a fraction of what you would pay to live in a European or American city. Additionally, when you’re working remotely in a tropical paradise you can make a clean break from debt-fueled consumerism and the corporate rat race.

“[L]andscapes are cultures before they are nature—constructs of the imagination projected onto wood and water and rock,” Simon Schama wrote in 1995. In 2019, the quote appeared in the introduction to John Berger’s Landscapes, which I’d finally found time to read in a zero-gravity lounge chair overlooking the sea. But it wasn’t just any sea. The water was really water but not the salty kind, instead of a sandy bottom there was stainless steel flooring and, from the horizon, a gigantic canvas screen-printed with a photo of a blue sky rose up. Outside the dome, the sun had broken through clouds; inside, it filtered through a UV screen. I applied more sunscreen to my face. I considered taking a dip.

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As we ventured further out, we saw a souvenir shop selling ice cream, candy, bottled water, and various articles of clothing or accessories with a San Diego logo. We found a small countertop display that had sunglasses for $9.99. It was perfect timing since it was almost 90 degrees out and the sun was out in full force. Next door to the shop is a restaurant called the Ocean Beach Pier Café which serves Mexican soft tacos, large breakfast plate offerings of three-egg omelets, tall pancake stacks with bacon and sausage links, humongous burgers, and seafood dishes such as fish and chips or clam chowder bread bowls. I saw a server bringing a monster plate of nachos to a single diner that was big enough to feed a group of four people.
Are you a bikini kind of girl? Be sure to check out our awesome mix and match bikini tops and bottoms. Our swimwear tops come in every style you can dream up, from cute and classic halter straps to oh-so-on-trend high-neck silhouettes. And for bottoms, we’ve got a crazy-awesome variety of cuts, from cheeky to high-waisted bikini bottoms so you can find the best style and fit for your body type and personality.
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